People in Places Doing Things
philartful:

youforeuh:

simplisticexistence:

littlemonsterhatesdemon:

Ominous Storm, The Bermuda Triangle

& we wonder why things get lost there………

wtffff

that’s not a storm that’s a fucking demon or something

philartful:

youforeuh:

simplisticexistence:

littlemonsterhatesdemon:

Ominous Storm, The Bermuda Triangle

& we wonder why things get lost there………

wtffff

that’s not a storm that’s a fucking demon or something

oldloves:

Last Week Tonight with John Oliver: on president Warren G. Harding’s recently released love letters to his mistress

atmospheric-phenomena:


Lightning on the Pacific Ocean | Alan Grinberg
 

thinksquad:

Chart: One Year of Prison Costs More Than One Year at Princeton

One year at Princeton University: $37,000. One year at a New Jersey state prison: $44,000.


Prison and college “are the two most divergent paths one can take in life,” Joseph Staten, an info-graphic researcher with Public Administration, says. Whereas one is a positive experience that increases lifetime earning potential, the other is a near dead end, which is why Staten found it striking that the lion’s share of government funding goes toward incarceration.

The comparison between higher education spending and correction spending highlighted in the following chart is not perfect. Universities have means to fund themselves; prisons rely on the government. So it makes some sense that a disproportional amount of money flows to the correction centers. Also, take note, comparing African Americans in college and African Americans in dorms is not completely fair. For one, college implies an 18-22 age range, and incarcerated adults can be of any age. Also, it doesn’t take into account African Americans who commute to school.

Despite these shortcomings, this chart helps illustrate a large discrepancy in this country: America has the highest incarceration rate by population, but is only 6th in the world when it comes to college degrees. Our government’s spending reflects that fact accordingly.

http://www.theatlantic.com/national/archive/2011/11/chart-one-year-of-prison-costs-more-than-one-year-at-princeton/247629/

mydarkenedeyes:

Underwater photography by Alexander Semenov.

fromquarkstoquasars:

Astronomy Photo of the Day (APotD): 7/31/14 — N44C
Located in the Large Magellanic Cloud — one of the neighboring satellites of the Milky Way galaxy — is this celestial area, formally known as N44C.
The nebula, which is an emission nebula by designation, is powered by a young, energetic central star that is not hot enough to generate some of the colorful filaments seen here. It might even be TOO hot, thus astronomers have put forth various explanations for this. One of which, suggests that the central star is also home to a yet-to-be-observed companion (perhaps a neutron star, the dense remnant of a massive star) that contributes to the periodic barrage of x-rays seen emitted from the nebula. Over the course of time, these x-rays disappear almost entirely before reappearing, perhaps “switching back on” when the companion dwells too close to the surrounding disk of interstellar gas.
N44C is also just as big as it is beautiful. Overall, it stretches over an expanse of space that would take 125 years to cross if you were traveling at light-speed.
Sources & Other Resources: http://bit.ly/1qMFgvI
Image via: Astro Don

fromquarkstoquasars:

Astronomy Photo of the Day (APotD): 7/31/14 — N44C

Located in the Large Magellanic Cloud — one of the neighboring satellites of the Milky Way galaxy — is this celestial area, formally known as N44C.

The nebula, which is an emission nebula by designation, is powered by a young, energetic central star that is not hot enough to generate some of the colorful filaments seen here. It might even be TOO hot, thus astronomers have put forth various explanations for this. One of which, suggests that the central star is also home to a yet-to-be-observed companion (perhaps a neutron star, the dense remnant of a massive star) that contributes to the periodic barrage of x-rays seen emitted from the nebula. Over the course of time, these x-rays disappear almost entirely before reappearing, perhaps “switching back on” when the companion dwells too close to the surrounding disk of interstellar gas.

N44C is also just as big as it is beautiful. Overall, it stretches over an expanse of space that would take 125 years to cross if you were traveling at light-speed.

Sources & Other Resources: http://bit.ly/1qMFgvI

Image via: Astro Don

fossilbird:

blondeisawesome:

A wave viewed from underwater

fossilbird:

blondeisawesome:

A wave viewed from underwater